This is Rape Culture: The Cosby Mistrial
Katie Breen
 |  
June 8, 2016

By now, you are likely familiar with the news that the Cosby case has ended in a mistrial due to a hung jury.

58 women give the same account of Bill Cosby raping them. 58 women said that they were drugged and sexually assaulted by a beloved celebrity with a then-sterling reputation, and many of them didn't come forward until years after the incident because they didn't think anyone would believe them. 58 women had their privacy invaded by the press and defense team, their credibility called into question by the public at every turn, and their every life's decision, sexual or otherwise, laid bare and analyzed in a courtroom and in the press, because many people didn't believe them. The accounts of 58 women were called into question because the account of one famous man contradicted these accounts.

Cosby admitted on the stand that he bought sedatives with the intention of giving them to women he wanted to have sex with.

Yet the jury just cannot reach a conclusion on his guilt or innocence. Because it's not clear whether these 58 women are going through brutal public dissection for attention or money, or to bring down a beloved celebrity. Who admitted to buying drugs with the intention of giving them to women he wanted to have sex with.

This is rape culture. This is why women don't report sexual assault.

The Aftershow: Episode 7
Katie Breen
 |  
June 8, 2016

 

Wanna learn more about the topics discussed in Episode 7: Conscious Period and Menstruating While Homeless? Read on. If you haven’t heard it yet, clickity-click here to listen.

Scary Chemicals in Tampons

The scariest culprit is glyphosate, the key ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup herbicide, ruled a likely carcinogen by the World Health Organization. An October 15 study showed that 85% of commercial tampons/pads contained glyphosate. Cotton is sprayed with the herbicide to ward off the weeds and bugs that destroy it. 96% of American-grown cotton is genetically modified, according to the USDA, which means that 96% of American cotton is sprayed with Roundup (article contains links to full studies).

Scientific studies have linked the chemicals in Monsanto's biocides to Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer’s disease, autism, and cancer.

There is no research that indicates the safety (or not) of commercial tampons.

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney has introduced legislation EIGHT TIMES between 1997 and 2014 that would support research into such the health risks of feminine hygiene products. It has never gone through. The legislation would direct the NIH to “research whether feminine hygiene products that contain dioxin, synthetic fibers, and other chemical additives like chlorine,

“We know that formaldehyde releasers, dioxin, pesticides and other harmful chemicals are found in feminine care products. What we don't know is exactly how these chemicals are impacting women's health.” 

“Internally worn products, such as tampons and cups, are worn in the most absorbent part of the body, off and on, for literally decades. Yet there is a paucity of independent research that addresses the potential risks associated with these and other menstrual products.”

 Well, that's a bummer. Luckily, thanks to Conscious Period you can get high-quality, BPA-free, chemical-free, dye-free tampons that support women living in homelessness! 

And here are some other informative links about topics discussed in the episode! Yay!

 

Menstruating While Homeless

Huffington Post looks at the problem in San Francisco

Glamour interviews 4 women about their experiences

LA Times looks at need of shelters for feminine hygiene products

Effects on women of not having sanitary period products

NPR: Girls in developing countries around the world not going to school once they hit puberty because of lack of water 

The Pink Tax

The “pink tax” typically refers to price differences between identical products/services marketed to women vs. marketed to men (such as razor blades, body wash, children's toys, etc.)
Washington Post explains the pink tax

The Tampon Tax 

The “tampon tax” refers to the 39 US states that charge a sales tax on feminine hygiene products as “non-necessary” goods (even though other products, like candy, soda, or Viagra, are exempt). 

Washington Post explains the tampon tax 

Cosmopolitan explains the tampon tax

 

FUNNY VIRAL VID

Lastly, check out Conscious Period going viral! Watch this (hilarious) video by Buzzfeed to meet CP's incredible cofounders (and Femtastic guests), Annie and Margo - and learn what it's like to be one of the millions of women going (aka bleeding) without feminine hygiene products. #ThisisNotaLuxury

 

Act Now to Stop Ohio's Dangerous (and Unconstitutional) Abortion Ban
Katie Breen
 |  
June 8, 2016

PLEASE READ IF YOU CARE ABOUT WOMEN. Tell Kasich to veto the "Heartbeat Bill," which would ban abortions, EVEN IN THE CASE OF RAPE OR INCEST OR HEALTH OF THE FETUS OR MOTHER, after what they say is six weeks of pregnancy, but is actually four weeks after conception - before most women even know they are pregnant.

You might be confused. Why is it actually four weeks after conception instead of six? Because “first day of last menstrual period" (LMP) is used as the standard starting point by doctors to determine weeks of pregnancy. This is because implantation of fertilized eggs is a very complicated business and it’s difficult to say exactly when it happens. So doctors use the woman’s first day of the last period as the starting point.

So let's say you have your period because you’re not pregnant. Ovulation happens two weeks after that, and the week that happens is when you are most likely to get pregnant. So let’s say you ovulate, and during that week, sperm fertilizes the egg. Then two weeks later, your first period is missed. Now let’s assume that you are someone who gets very regular periods, or who even HAS monthly periods (different types of birth control, IUDs, and BODIES make regular periods not a reality for millions of women). So, since you’re one of those people who gets their period at the exact same time every month, you’re alarmed. You think you might be pregnant. But many doctors will tell you to wait one to two weeks after missing the period to take a pregnancy test, as the levels of the pregnancy hormone, hCG, may not even be detectable before that point, so pregnancy tests in the first two weeks after the missed period are unreliable and often give false negatives.

So you wait two weeks after the missed period, and you discover you’re pregnant. But this is America, and Roe v. Wade has been in effect since 1973 and says it’s unconstitutional to limit abortion restrictions before fetal viability which the law (but not the medical profession) says happens at 24 weeks, so you have 18 weeks to make some very personal choices, right? Wrong. It’s already too late. In the eyes of the medical profession, you're technically already at six weeks of pregnancy, even though fertilization only happened a month ago, because "date of last period" is used as the standardized starting point. And if you live in Ohio, where they’ve passed this bill that outlaws abortion after six weeks, you have no choice but to carry through with the pregnancy. In effect, this law bans almost all abortions.

Sounds unconstitutional? Sounds like it goes against Roe v. Wade? That’s because it does. Similar states have tried to pass laws just like this one, and they’ve been struck down in court. This law will likely also be struck down as unconstitutional, but in the meantime while the legal battle ensues, women in Ohio are forced into pregnancy, regardless of the circumstance. Regardless of rape, incest, or the health and safety of the mother. Regardless of the fact that women’s choices have been protected since 1973 in this country.

And the whole reason Roe v. Wade passed? It wasn’t that the court was super progressive about women’s rights, or because the conservative justices put aside their religious beliefs. The reality is that in 1973, Roe vs. Wade was decided by a Court that was comprised of a majority of justices who were nominated by Republican presidents and therefore considered "conservative" justices. There were only two dissenters, only one of whom was conservative.

Roe v. Wade was decided the way it was because of the appalling number of women who were DYING due to self-induced or back-alley abortions, or because they were forced to carry through with dangerous pregnancies. Roe v. Wade was passed to save the lives of women who would otherwise die if not given the option of safely and legally aborting their pregnancies.

Sign the petition and call the office. The number is: 614-466-3555

P.S. They use the term "heartbeat" to prey on people's emotions. At six weeks, a fetus does not have what we would think of as a proper heart; rather, it has blood vessels that pump blood. "Heartbeats" like these can happen in petri dishes. Check out the Youtube videos of it.

P.P.S. Republican Representative Jim Buchy was a strong proponent for the bill, which he said would “encourage personal responsibility.” “What we have here is really the need to give people the incentive to be more responsible so we reduce unwanted pregnancies.” So since this doesn’t allow exceptions for rape, incest, or dangerous pregnancies, this also means that these women should be “more responsible” for their situations?

When asked what he thinks makes a woman want to have an abortion, he admitted that he’d “never even thought about it.” He says: “Well, there’s probably a lot of reas— I’m not a woman.” He laughs. “I’m thinking now if I’m a woman why would I want to get … Some of it has to do with economics. A lot of it has to do with economics. I don’t know. It’s a question I’ve never even thought about.”

The Aftershow: Episode 6
Katie Breen
 |  
June 8, 2016

The aftershow this week is this: GO VOTE AS SOON AS YOU CAN.

First and foremost, VOTE.

If you haven’t already voted (if early voting is available in your state) or made a plan to vote on Tuesday, DO SO NOW. 

Block off some time on your calendar. Make sure colleagues know you’re unavailable at X time because you’ll be voting (and if they give you any shit, tell them to suck it because employers are legally obligated to let you vote. Check out your state's laws on this here). Ask a friend (or 12) to go with you for accountability. Host a party with an “I Voted” sticker required for entry. 

Second, make sure you’re voting informed ALL THE WAY DOWN THE BALLOT. 

Read here (or listen to Episode 6) for a reminder of why voting for your local officials is so important, and check out voter guides like BallotReady to stay informed. And/or (if BallotReady isn't available in your state yet) check out the voting guides of organizations you care about. 

For example, Planned Parenthood offers a voter guide for every single state here, and some state ACLU chapters, like Colorado’s, offer comprehensive voting guides. Search in the Googles for “ACLU of (Insert Your State Here) Voter Guide 2016” and see what comes up.

Third, DO SOMETHING.

Volunteer to make calls from the comfort of your home to remind Hillary supporters to vote. If you live in the Denver area, come out an canvas with me (and Lena Dunham!!!!) on Saturday in Denver, or phone bank on Monday.

Donate so that we can turn out more voters in battleground states where Hillary needs to win. Can you spare just $5 or $10 to give to Hillary’s campaign?

FOURTH, don’t forget about the Senate.  

It’s time to take it back. The New York Times says it’s almost a pure toss-up right now. Chip in $5 like I just did to help mobilize a last-minute push to get our the vote and help take back the Senate.

Planned Parenthood Action Fund and UltraViolet need funds to recruit volunteers in three key states where progressive women are running against right-wing Republicans. Here’s the quick summary on these races and what’s at stake:

· In Pennsylvania, Katie McGinty is running against Senator Pat Toomey, who wants to put abortion providers in jail and still refuses to even tell voters whether he supports Trump

· In New Hampshire, Governor Maggie Hassan is running against right-wing Senator Kelly Ayotte, who is anti-choice, opposed federal equal pay legislation, and called Donald Trump a "role model." 

· In Nevada, it's Attorney General Catherine Cortez Masto vs. Representative Joe Heck, who is so anti-woman that he would criminalize abortion for rape victims. He also voted for "personhood" legislation so extreme it would ban some forms of birth control.

Polls show that each of these races are pure toss-ups--and if these progressive women win, it's a virtual lock that Democrats will win the Senate.

That’s it. 

PLEASE GO VOTE.

The Aftershow: Episode 5
Katie Breen
 |  
June 8, 2016

In the last episode, I spoke to April Greene of The Magnolia Fund, which provides financial and practical support for women who need assistance in obtaining abortions.

First and foremost, The Magnolia Fund is made possible entirely by the contributions of people like you. Please consider donating to the fund here. Your contribution will make a meaningful, lifelong impact on the woman it helps.

 

And without further ado, some resources about topics mentioned in the episode:

 

The Hyde Amendment and why it’s total BS:

The article linked to above describes how the Hyde Amendment is a policy that bans the use of Medicaid to cover the cost of an abortion.

“Since Medicaid enrollees are predominantly low-income women, the Hyde Amendment has essentially turned abortion into a luxury item for women who can afford to pay for the procedure out-of-pocket.”

The article also touches on the absurdly high cost of abortions for those on public assistance and not – because even if you’re not on Medicaid, abortions are often not covered by private insurance.

“A first-trimester abortion cost an average of $470 in 2009… Second, these women must also bear the practical costs imposed by state restrictions, like multiple doctor’s office visits and unnecessary waiting periods. A low-income single mother who needs to pay for travel to the nearest clinic, a night at a hotel due to a mandatory waiting period, childcare, and lost earnings from work, could end up paying an additional $1,380.”

And what about the Affordable Care Act, you ask? According to healthinsurance.gov, some ACA plans do cover abortion and some 25 states have done so…Eight states do not allow an exception for cases where the pregnancy is the result of rape or incest.”

Read here about Barbara Lee and the Each Woman Act, which seeks to undo the damage that the Hyde Amendment and the ACA’s abortion bans have created. The act would require: 

a) If a woman gets her healthcare through the federal government, she will be covered for all pregnancy-related care, including abortion.

b) Federal, state, and local legislators will not be able to interfere with private insurance markets to prevent insurance companies from providing abortion coverage.

 

The Sham of Crisis Pregnancy Centers

If you’d rather laugh before becoming furious and sad, here is Samantha Bee’s hilarious take on the sham of Crisis Pregnancy Centers.

This article details the report that NARAL conducted on crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs) in California, as mentioned in the episode. “CPCs strategically misinform and deceive pregnant people, always with the same underlying (or explicit) message: bring the pregnancy to term.

91% of centers visited by NARAL doled out misinformation about the effects of abortion on a person’s physical and mental health, saying that having an abortion would increase the risk of breast cancer, infertility, miscarriage, and/or depression that results in suicide.”

This article offers a nice primer as well: "CPCs increasingly look just like doctor's offices with ultrasound rooms and staff in scrubs. Yet they do not provide or refer for contraception or abortion. Many pregnancy-center counselors, even those who provide medical information, are not licensed. And even some workers who are licensed, such as nurses and ultrasound technicians, repeat myths about abortion and contraception.”

"Every year, thousands of women…seek help at what appear to be secular medical clinics but are actually Christian anti-abortion centers. Throughout the United States, there are at least 3,000 crisis pregnancy centers [crisis pregnancy centers outnumber abortion clinics nationwide by 3 to 1], many of which belong to two religious anti-abortion organizations — Care Net and Heartbeat International. 

All of this is supported by tens of millions of federal and state dollars. At least 11 states now directly fund pregnancy centers…Many states refer low-income pregnant women to anti-abortion centers on health department websites.

Few states, however, have any laws regulating how pregnancy centers interact with women.”

Thankfully, California has enacted the FACT Act, which requires crisis pregnancy centers to disclose that they are not licensed as medical facilities by the state. It’s a step in the right direction in one state.

 

States Requiring Doctors to Read False Medical Info to Patients Receiving Abortions

 This article describes how, “according to the Guttmacher Institute, women in 17 states must be counseled on points that are wholly unsupported by the medical and scientific community at large, like the link between abortion and breast cancer, fetal pain, or long-term mental health risks from abortion like depression and suicide for women.”

 And Broadly has compiled a state-by-state list of the lies that abortion doctors are required to tell women. The information in these abortion-specific informed consent materials is chosen by legislators, not doctors.

“Though lawmakers insist that such policies are meant to ensure that women are making informed and safe choices about their own bodies, the informed consent materials are often rife with medically inaccurate and misleading statements.”

Abortion and Parental Involvement Laws

Advocates for Youth describes parental involvement laws that require either parental notification or consent for abortions to be performed on minors as a “threat to young women’s health and safety.” 

“The majority of states – thirty-nine as of December 2013 – currently enforce laws that require a young woman to notify or obtain consent from one or both parents before she can receive abortion care. Yet research has shown that these laws often delay young women’s access, endangering young women’s health and safety, and leaving too many alone and afraid. Ideally, any woman…who is faced with an unintended pregnancy can seek the advice of those who care for her. But for those who can't…or who face the threat of violence in their homes—it is best for them to seek the advice of a trained medical professional.

 

Well now, wasn’t that depressing?

 

Here are some links to reproductive rights organizations mentioned in the episode:

 

National Network of Abortion Funds

All Above All

Spark: Reproductive Justice Now

SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective

Access Reproductive Care Southeast

Katie Speaks at Ignite Boulder
Katie Breen
 |  
June 8, 2016

Your brave leader/host/HBIC, Katie Breen, recently spoke at Ignite Boulder on why sex ed in America sucks. Watch her here saying "clitoral stimulation" and using her arm to simulate putting on a condom in front of 1000 people.

The Aftershow: Episode 4
Katie Breen
 |  
June 8, 2016

Sorry for the delay, peeps! I usually drop the Aftershow post a few days after releasing its accompanying episode (this one being Episode 4: Campus Sexual Assault and Title IX). But this time, I decided to go on vacation instead! It's been a long and busy summer, spent not only launching the podcast and holdin' down a day job, but also filming a docu-comedy reality tv show with MTV for said day job. While on vacay, I was invited to speak at Ignite Boulder on Thurs 9/8, so I've been busy prepping for that as well. Anywho - here it is, in slightly less comprehensive form because I'm busy AF:

Dear Colleague Letter

Tara mentioned the Department of Education's Dear Colleague Letter, written in 2011, which told colleges and universities:

"The U.S. Department of Education and its Office for Civil Rights (OCR) believe that providing all students with an educational environment free from discrimination is extremely important. The sexual harassment of students, including sexual violence, interferes with students’ right to receive an education free from discrimination and, in the case of sexual violence, is a crime.
[…]
In order to assist recipients, which include school districts, colleges, and universities (hereinafter "schools" or "recipients") in meeting these obligations, this letter explains that the requirements of Title IX pertaining to sexual harassment also cover sexual violence, and lays out the specific Title IX requirements applicable to sexual violence. A number of different acts fall into the category of sexual violence, including rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, and sexual coercion. All such acts of sexual violence are forms of sexual harassment covered under Title IX. [Internal citations omitted.] "

You can read more about the letter here

You can learn more about Title IX, which is most widely known for its impact women's college athletics, here.

Gaslighting

You can read more about gaslighting here, in a helpful explainer from the National Domestic Violence Hotline. TL;DR:

This term comes from the 1938 stage play Gas Light, in which a husband attempts to drive his wife crazy by dimming the lights (which were powered by gas) in their home, and then he denies that the light changed when his wife points it out. It is an extremely effective form of emotional abuse that causes a victim to question their own feelings, instincts, and sanity, which gives the abusive partner a lot of power (and we know that abuse is about power and control). Once an abusive partner has broken down the victim’s ability to trust their own perceptions, the victim is more likely to stay in the abusive relationship.

Book and Documentary about Campus Sexual Assault and Title IX

Jon Krakauer, author of bestsellers-turned-movie-adaptations "Into the Wild" and "Into Thin Air," wrote Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town. Missoula is the location of the University of Montana, where the Department of Justice investigated 350 sexual assaults reported to Missoula police between January 2008 and 2012. The book is an excellent case study on the huge problem of campus sexual assault in the US, including how police and universities all too often mishandle the cases and victim-blame the survivors. "Krakauer’s devastating narrative of what happened in Missoula makes clear why rape is so prevalent on American campuses, and why rape victims are so reluctant to report

The Hunting Ground is a documentary that "follows undergraduate rape survivors pursuing both their education and justice, despite ongoing harassment and the devastating toll on them and their families." You may have seen Lady Gaga at the Oscars performing the song "Til It Happens to You," which she co-wrote for the film. 

"Since the film’s premiere at Sundance, it had been screened at the White House and hundreds of college campuses across the country. The documentary has inspired new laws in New York and California and changes in campus policies."

Joe Biden's Work on Campus Sexual Assault

Biden helped spearhead the creation of the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault. In 2014, the task force launched the It’s On Us campaign. 

See more of Biden's remarks on college sexual assault here and here. Read here about his efforts throughout his career to end violence against women. Read here to learn about his efforts to use federal funding to clear rape kit backlogs.

Read his moving letter to the survivor of the Stanford sexual assault perpetrated by Brock Turner, the rapist that spent a mere three months in prison.

Read here about how Biden and Obama announced that they refuse to visit colleges and universities that are not taking sexual assault seriously.

And here is a tear-jerking photo of Vice President Joe Biden comforting a CU student and sexual assault survivor after seeing her crying following her speech about campus sexual assault.

The Neurobiology of Trauma

This is the video Tara mentioned about what happens to the brain following trauma, and thus why and how the lives of trauma victims are so detrimentally impacted. This, of course, is the case not only for victims of sexual assault, but those who have experienced any type of trauma, such as war, car accidents, robberies, house fires, seeing someone die, or any other acutely traumatic incident. 

CU Students and Their Rapes and Stuff

Read here about the case I mentioned of men, one of whom is a student at the University of Colorado, using Title IX to fight the disciplinary actions they received from their universities following allegations of sexual assault. They believe that they did not receive due process in their sexual assault investigations and that their universities were biased against in the investigations because they were male.

And here is the case of the CU student who was convicted of rape and instead of going to prison, got two years of work release and probation. Gosh, male bias is so tough. 

The Aftershow: Episode 3
Katie Breen
 |  
June 8, 2016

As promised in Episode 3, here's some fuel for your noggin' related to the topics we discussed.

WOMEN, SEXUALITY, AND THE EXCLUSION OF WOMEN'S SEXUALITY FROM SEX ED

On the exclusion of female pleasure from our conversations about sex:

In the interview, I highly recommended the book Girls & Sex, by Peggy Orenstein. In this NPR interview, the author discusses the importance of talking to young women about their bodies and their pleasure, and the importance of ignoring cultural messages that tell them to disown their own pleasure while focusing on their partners'.  

"Parents don't tend to name their infant baby's genitals if they're girls. For boys, they'll say, 'Here's your nose...here's your waist, here's your

Then they go into puberty education class...and you see only the inside anatomy — that thing that looks like a steer head, with the ovaries and everything — and then it grays out between the legs, so we never talk about the vulva, we never talk about the clitoris. Very few girls explore, there's no self-knowledge, and then they go into their sexual experiences and we expect them to be able to have some sense of entitlement, some sense of knowledge, to be able to assert themselves, to have some sense of equality, and it's just not realistic that that's going to happen."

A suggestion for anyone wanting to learn more about female sexual desire:

Melanie recommended the book Come as You Are, "an essential exploration of why and how women’s sexuality works—based on groundbreaking research and brain science." TL;DR: every woman's sexuality is different, and stress/mood/emotional attachment 100% impact women's sexual desire.

ON FALSE ACCUSATIONS OF RAPE

TL;DR: THEY ARE VERY RARE. In the podcast, we discussed how when Melanie teaches young people about victim-blaming and slut-shaming, she frequently runs up against the insidious, tragic cultural belief that many rape accusations are false.

In Donna Zuckerberg's article "He Said, She Said: The Mythical History of the False Rape Allegation," she reports:

"The most commonly accepted statistic is that 2-8 percent of rape allegations are false.

To be absolutely clear: that means 2-8 percent of the reports made to the police are later proven to have been made by somebody who knew that the person they were accusing was innocent. And when you consider that many victims choose not to go to the police at all, the ratio of people who have actually experienced sexual assault to people who have falsely claimed to have experienced sexual assault gets—one presumes—even larger. The number of false rape allegations is small: it’s not zero, but it’s small. The amount of fear and worry and hand-wringing about these false allegations is disproportionate to their actual prevalence."

INCLUDING GENDER IDENTITY AND SEXUAL ORIENTATION IN SEX ED

LGBQ/T Sex Ed, Bullying, and Suicide:

In the podcast, Melanie and I discussed the importance of including lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, and trans (LGBG/T) individuals in discussions about sex education. Not only is it important that these folks receive accurate, applicable information about STIs, pregnancy prevention, and sex just like their heterosexual or gender-conforming peers, but it's also incredibly important that these identities are normalized - not only for the folks who identify as being non-heterosexual or non-gender conforming, but for those who don't.

LGBT youth experience bullying at elevated rates. The National School Climate Survey conducted by GLSEN in 2011 reported these statistics on bullying:

82% of LGBT youth had problems during the previous year with bullying about sexual orientation. 64% felt unsafe at school due to sexual orientation. 44% felt unsafe at school due to gender identification. According to surveys cited in this article, 4.6% of the overall U.S. population has self-reported a suicide attempt, while between 10-20% of lesbian, gay or bisexual respondents have done so. By comparison, 41% of trans or gender non-conforming people surveyed have attempted suicide.

Regularly including LGBQ/T folks in discussions of sex ed helps normalize these identities, reducing isolation and internal shame among those who fall into these groups, and giving heterosexual and/or gender-conforming folks the chance to become familiar and comfortable with identities formerly seen as "other."

EXPLOITATION OF PEOPLE OF COLOR 

Melanie discussed that one reason sex education should be intersectional is that much scientific research, including that related to sexual and reproductive health, was performed on non-consenting people of color.

The Tuskegee Syphilis Study, for example, "was an infamous clinical study conducted between 1932 and 1972 by the U.S. Public Health Service studying the natural progression of untreated syphilis in rural African-American men in Alabama under the guise of receiving free health care from the United States government."

Henrietta Lacks, whom I mentioned in the podcast,  had a best-selling book written about her. "She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells—taken without her knowledge in 1951—became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. Henrietta's cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yet she remains virtually unknown, and her family can't afford health insurance."

America also looooooves to forget its eugenics programs, which STERILIZED AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN UNTIL THE 1970s. Yes, you read that right.

"U.S. women of color have historically been the victims of forced sterilization. Some women were sterilized during Cesarean sections and never told; others were threatened with termination of welfare benefits or denial of medical care if they didn’t 'consent' to the procedure; others received unnecessary hysterectomies at teaching hospitals as practice for medical residents. In the

North Carolina's eugenics board wasn't disbanded until 1977, and the law allowing involuntary sterilization wasn’t officially repealed until 2003.

"It began as a way to control welfare spending on poor white women and men, but over time, North Carolina shifted focus, targeting more women and more blacks than whites.  A third of the sterilizations performed in North Carolina were done on girls under the age of 18.  Some were as young as nine years old.

During that time period [from 1929 to 1974], 7,600 people were sterilized in North Carolina.  Of those who were sterilized, 85 percent of the victims were female and 40 percent were non-white." YEP. BET YA DIDN'T LEARN THAT IN HIGH SCHOOL U.S. HISTORY CLASS!

STI STIGMA

In the episode, we talked about the shame and stigma surrounding STIs. Melanie recommended this TedxTalk called "STIs Aren't a Consequence,They're Inevitable." 

"An STI is not a reflection of your character or a consequence of a bad decision. It is an inevitably of being a human being on this planet who comes into skin contact with other humans. Period. End of discussion. "

In the talk, Ella Dawson explains why stigma around sexually transmitted infections (and herpes in particular) exists, and also how incredibly common STIs are. According to the World Health Organization, 2 in 3 people worldwide have Herpes Simplex Virus 1, a particular strand of the herpes virus that causes cold sores, and can in some cases cause genital herpes. Herpes Simplex Virus 2, a strand of herpes that exclusively causes genital symptoms, affects 1 in 6 people and 1 in 5 women.

CONSENT

On teaching children consent:

Melanie discussed how teaching children about consent outside the context of sexuality cartoon about consent, written by a mother.

"Once my daughter became old enough to understand and respond to questions, I began asking for permission to touch her. Why do I do this? As a sexual assault survivor, teaching my kid about consent is a form of activism. If I had the words to describe what was happening to me as a young girl, I may have stepped up and said something sooner. Or maybe it would have alleviated the confusion and shame I felt for years

Affirmative consent:

I realized that I'd referenced "affirmative consent" in several episodes, but I have never defined in during an episode for people who aren't familiar with the term. The principles of affirmative consent are defined here, but the short version is: 

“Affirmative consent is a knowing, voluntary, and mutual decision among all participants to engage in sexual activity.  Consent can be given by words or actions, as long as those words or actions create clear permission regarding willingness to engage in the sexual activity. Silence or lack of resistance, in and of itself, does not demonstrate consent.”

On affirmative consent and education:

This article discusses California's enactment of "Yes Means Yes" legislation. All colleges receiving state funding for student financial aid are required to adopt an affirmative consent, or "Yes Means Yes," standard to be used when investigating and disciplining campus sexual assaults.

Melanie and I spoke about the importance of teaching kids about sexual consent during their sex education. In the same article above about affirmative consent legislation at the college-level, we learn that:

"To better educate California’s youth on affirmative consent, Gov. Jerry Brown...signed into law a new piece of legislation...which requires public high schools to develop

RESOURCES FOR EDUCATORS

A sex ed curriculum focused on Transgender Identities:

Melanie mentioned a curriculum for sex educators called "Teaching Transgender," published by Out for Health and Planned Parenthood of the Southern Finger Lakes (PPSFL). (In the podcast, we accidentally credited the Center for Sexual Education with the curriculum!)

"With particular attention paid to intersectional approaches and marginalized identities," the curriculum addresses "transgender people’s identities and experiences" and the "nuances of teaching about transgender-related topics." The end goal is that "participants will be well prepared to acknowledge, support, and engage with transgender people in an affirming manner."

An organization for sexual health workers who are Women of Color:

Melanie spoke about the Women of Color Sexual Health Network - a group of sexuality professionals which focuses "on the sexual and reproductive health needs of women of color." WOCSHN is place for women of color sexuality professionals to share their experiences; a place to gain support when they are shut out, pushed aside, silenced, erased and otherwise considered nonexistent....We wanted to look

"WOCSHN creates opportunities for the inclusion of women of color in the field of sexuality, sexology, and sexual health; challenges the White supremacy these fields were built upon. We

Bonus Content from Episode 2: Public Defender Julia Burke
Katie Breen
 |  
June 8, 2016

In Episode 2, I interview Julia Burke - a public defender in Queens, NY.  We talked a ton about the criminal justice system as it relates to domestic violence. Check out the links below to learn more about the topics discussed in the episode. Haven't heard the episode yet? Check it out here or on iTunes.

Coercive Control as a Better Way to Understand and Describe Abuse

This article explains why “coercive control” is a more accurate phrase than “domestic violence,” as being victimized does not always involve physical violence, and it certainly is rarely contained purely to the “domestic” space. Coercive control “is a pattern of behaviour which seeks to take away the victim’s liberty or freedom, to strip away their sense of self.” Understanding domestic abuse as coercive control means better understanding the experiences, reactions, and decisions of victims.

“Violence is used (or not) alongside a range of other tactics – isolation, degradation, mind-games, and the micro-regulation of everyday life (monitoring phone calls, dress, food consumption, social activity etc). The perpetrator creates a world in which the victim is constantly monitored and criticised; every move is checked against an unpredictable, ever-changing, unknowable ‘rule-book’....the victim becomes brainwashed, internalising the rules, adapting her behaviour to survive. Coercive control is the white noise against which she plays out her life; ever present, ever threatening. The strength to live with this and to function daily in a range of settings – to survive – is enormous and courageous."

Battered Women's Syndrome 

Julia mentioned that sometimes Battered Women's Syndrome (BWS) can be used as a legal defense when defending victims of domestic violence who have been arrested after retaliating against their abusers. A necessary thing, as a 1996 government study found that 93% of women convicted of killing current or former intimate partners had been physically or sexually abused by a partner.

This article defines BWS as "a mental disorder that develops in victims of domestic violence as a result of serious, long-term abuse. BWS is dangerous primarily because it leads to “learned helplessness” – or psychological paralysis – where the victim becomes so depressed, defeated, and passive that she believes she is incapable of leaving the abusive situation. Though it may seem like an irrational fear, it feels absolutely real to the victim. Feeling fearful and weak, and sometimes even still holding onto the hope that her abuser will stop hurting her, the victim remains with her abuser, continuing the cycle of domestic violence and strengthening her existing BWS."

How Victims Become Trapped in the Criminal Justice System

Women's prisons are overwhelmingly filled with women who have a history of suffering physical or sexual abuse. Whether that abuse directly caused their incarceration (i.e. they killed their abusers) or indirectly caused it (a majority of women incarcerated in the NYC jail system reported engaging in illegal activity (such as the use of illegal drugs) in response to experiences of abuse, the threat of violence, or coercion by their male partners), relationship and sexual abuse is an issue that needs to be understood in order to understand the criminal activity and incarceration of women. This fact sheet does an incredible job of explaining the stats. Lowlights include:

"82% of women incarcerated at New York’s Bedford Hills Correctional Facility had a childhood history of severe physical and/or sexual abuse and more than 90% had endured physical or sexual violence in their lifetimes. 75% of the women had experienced severe physical violence by an intimate partner during adulthood."

"Nationwide, more than 57% of women in state prisons and 55% of women in local jails report having been physically and/or sexually abused in the past."

"The U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that more than 37% of women in state prisons have been raped before their incarceration."

"Women in prison are at least twice as likely as women in the general public to report childhood histories of physical or sexual abuse."

Domestic Violence and Retaliatory Litigation

Here's an article about how domestic abusers use retaliatory litigation to further abuse their victims. By suing their victims once victims use the legal system to try to get away from the abuse (such as suing the victim for defamation after they report the abuse, reporting the survivor to immigration authorities to have the survivor deported, or trying to take the victim's children away by filing for sole custody), "the very legal system that a victim once believed would protect her from that abuser essentially becomes another weapon that can cause emotional and financial devastation." 

Holistic Criminal Defense

Julia talked about how she strives to provide holistic criminal defense. This site, by The Bronx Defenders, defines holistic defense as "an innovative model of public defense...that combines aggressive legal advocacy with a broader recognition that for most poor people arrested and charged with a crime, the criminal case is not the only issue with which they struggle." Learn more about the principles and importance of holistic criminal defense here. TL;DR: Sociocultural factors. CONSIDER 'EM.

The Plea Bargain and Why People Plead Guilty to Crimes They Didn't Commit

This article, according to Julia, "is the best thing out there on why innocent people plead guilty, and talks about plea bargaining as the predominate form of 'justice' over trials."

A "fun" fact: In 2013, more than 97 percent of federal criminal charges were resolved through plea bargains, and fewer than 3 percent went to trial. 

TL;DR: The prosecutor has all the power. When he/she meets with the "information-deprived defense lawyer," the prosecutor makes it clear that, "unless the case can be promptly resolved by a plea bargain, he intends to charge the defendant with the most severe offenses he can prove.... If, however, the defendant wants to plead guilty, the prosecutor will offer him a considerably reduced charge—but only if the plea is agreed to promptly.... Otherwise, he will charge the maximum, and...it will be to a higher-level offense than the one offered at the outset of the case." Womp.

The Difficulty of Criminal Defense, Plus Why We Must Establish Affirmative Consent as the Standard

This article is about the difficulty of being both a feminist and a criminal defense attorney. Written after the Brock Turner case, author Jill Filipovic makes the case for why affirmative consent MUST be the standard we use in determining whether a sex act was criminal.

1) I asked Julia a question that she gets asked all the time - isn't it difficult to defend someone who you know did something terrible? The author of this article sums it up in much the same way Julia did: yes, but criminal defense is a vital part of keeping our justice system...well, just.

"Vigorously defending a client is a defense attorney's job, and that vigorous defense is a vital component of our criminal justice system.... This is how it should work. It should be a high bar to convict someone of a crime, to put them in jail, take away their liberty."

2) This is why affirmative consent must be the standard:

"If we understand that sex as something parties enter into for mutual pleasure as opposed to one party getting something from the other, and if we believe that the burden should not be on women to fight men off but on men to not penetrate people without consent — and while of course men are sexually assaulted, women are assaulted much more often, and it is almost always men committing sexual assaults — then affirmative consent should be the standard we use in determining whether a sex act was criminal. Our criminal code should change to reflect that standard."

Wanna Learn More About Topics in Episode I?
Katie Breen
 |  
June 8, 2016

In the first episode of Femtastic, I had a fascinating conversation with Jillian Coffey, the Field Organizing Specialist for Planned Parenthood of Colorado. (Check it out here if you haven't yet!)

Want to learn more about some of the topics we touched on? Here's some bonus content on...

THE GENDER PAY GAP

This report by the AAUW breaks down the pay gap by not only gender, but also by race. Highlights (well, they're really lowlights but...ya know): 

In 2014, women working full time in the United States typically were paid on average just 79 percent of what men were paid, a gap of 21 percent.  And as we know, women of color have it far worse. African American women get paid 63 cents to the dollar compared to men, while Hispanic women receive 54 cents to the dollar. The report has a brief breakdown of suggestions for ways that corporations, individuals, and policy makers can help close the wage gap. Check it out.

COLORADO'S LONG-ACTING REVERSIBLE CONTRACEPTION (LARC) PROGRAM AND LAWMAKERS' WILLFUL IGNORANCE OF EMPIRICAL RESEARCH  

According to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (you may know them as OB/GYNs),  "long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) methods include the intrauterine device (IUD) and the birth control implant. Both methods are highly effective in preventing pregnancy, last for several years, and are easy to use. Both are reversible—if you want to become pregnant or if you want to stop using them, you can have them removed at any time." WOW, WHAT A TIME TO BE ALIVE!

[If you're a healthcare provider, check out the ACOG's LARC Program - it provides a broad range of resources on Long-Acting Reversible Contraception including clinical guidance, educational materials adapted for various patient languages/cultures, and more.]

Anywho, on the podcast Jillian and Katie discussed Colorado's LARC program. Thanks to free IUDs and hormonal implants provided to teen, young adult, and low-income Colorado women, the state experienced what is by all accounts a startling decline in unintended pregnancies and abortions. A decline so startling that other states took notice and quickly implemented similar programs. 

The state saw a 40 percent decline in births among teen moms and a 42 percent decline in teen abortions from 2009 to 2013.  Births among low-income women dropped 39% among women ages 15-19 and 22% among women ages 20-24. The birth rate for Medicaid-eligible women ages 15 to 24 dropped sharply, resulting in an estimated $49 million to $111 million avoided expenses in Medicaid birth-related costs alone. THESE ARE HUGE PERCENTAGES, FAM. 

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper said the savings in Medicaid and government assistance far outweigh the up-front costs.

"What greater gift can you give to a teenaged potential mother than the opportunity to plan her family so when she has children, it's when they're wanted, when she can afford to care for them ... and to do it in such a cost-effective way in terms of government spending? It dramatically reduces government spending," he said.

Reducing unintended pregnancy? Reducing abortion? REDUCING WELFARE SPENDING?! Now THAT sounds like something Republicans can get behind! Right? Right?! 

Ugh. Wrong.

In May 2015, Colorado’s Republican-controlled senate killed a bill that would sustain and expand the program.

Lawmakers like Rep. Kathleen Conti complained that the long-acting birth control is too expensive and sends the wrong message to teenagers who should instead be taught to refrain from sex. Others raised the disputed concern that IUDs themselves can cause abortions.

For now, Colorado is relying on a patchwork of private grants to continue its family planning initiative. 

HOW TO GET INVOLVED IN THE FIGHT FOR REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS 

Check out Planned Parenthood Action Fund to search for your state and find local advocacy information and even more ways to get involved. Like Jill said - while your donations are ALWAYS appreciated and incredibly impactful, your time spent as a volunteer is truly priceless.

Know how politicians are voting in your state! Check out the 2016 Congressional Scorecard compiled by PPAF to educate and inform citizens about members of Congress' record of support for women's health. The scores are based on votes on key legislation related to women's healthcare and rights. Select your state to learn more about how your state representatives voted. Remember - if our reps are doing a sucky job of advocating for women, it's up to us to either LOBBY (<-- seriously, that link will tell you how) legislators so that they know where their constituents stand on important issues...or VOTE those suckers outta power.  DEMOCRACY, PEOPLE.

Peace, Love, and IUDs,

Katie

Femtastic is Coming!
Katie Breen
 |  
June 8, 2016

What's the Femtastic Podcast? It's where Katie Breen interviews feminist activists, researchers, and advocates working to make women's issues...well, non-issues. Katie explores issues of reproductive rights, pay equity, abortion, birth control, sex ed, paid family leave, breastfeeding, periods, reproductive healthcare, domestic violence, sexual assault, and LGBTQ issues - examining topics through the lens of intersectional feminism and reproductive justice. We also laugh.

Episodes are coming soon, but in the meantime, if you could be a doll and like us on Facebook and throw us a pity-follow on Twitter and Instagram - that would be swell. Really want to be an A+ Overachiever? Share us on those channels. Tell yo friends. Tell strangers. Tell your OB/GYN. You feel me? 

Also subscribe to receive an email every time something exciting happens - like a new episode!

Peace, Love, and Uteruses (that sounds pretty weird pluralized),

Femtastic